Posts Tagged ‘safe sex’

“Winnable Public Health Battles” Teen Pregnancy

May 28th, 2010

For regular readers, you know this is the last topic of the CDCs 5 “winnable battles”.  CDC’s new leader, Dr. Thomas Frieden, is focusing the agency’s energies on these topics because he believes we can beat them in three years.

5.     Teen Pregnancy

Preventing teen childbearing could save the United States about $9 Billion per year. Teen mothers face higher rates of preterm birth, and their kids have higher rates of low birth weight, and infant death.  Compared to women who delay childbearing until the age of 20 to 21 years, teenage moms are more likely to drop out of high school, and to be and remain single parents. The children of teenage mothers are more likely to have lower grades and proficiency scores at kindergarten entry; they’re more likley to have behavior problems and chronic medical conditions; and they rely more heavily on publicly-provided health care (AHCCCS).  They’re more likely to be jailed at some time during adolescence until their early 30s, drop out of high school, give birth as a teenager, and be unemployed or underemployed as a young adult.

That’s basically why the CDC’s picking this as a battle.  But, just like childhood obesity- interventions to decrease teen pregnancies will take time and involve a lot more than just public health…  it’s multi-factorial and will require coordinated interventions from many sectors.  You can read more on our website about Arizona’s Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs on our Abstinence Education and Comprehensive Education sites.

Did smallpox vaccination halt spread of HIV?

May 21st, 2010

A study published this week in the journal BMC Immunology suggests that being vaccinated for smallpox triggered by the smallpox vaccine may inhibit the growth of the HIV.  The researchers extracted white blood cells from subjects and exposed them to HIV in a culture dish. The results showed that HIV replication was slowed by about 80 percent in the cells from those who had received smallpox vaccination.   The full article is posted at:         http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2172-11-23.pdf.  Before drawing conclusions, consider that this in an in-vitro study cell culture study and the sample size is only 20, but it may suggest that further research is warranted to find out whether there is some kind of cross protection that the smallpox vaccine provides.